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Hurstville Boys Campus

Hurstville Boys Campus

Georges River College

Telephone02 9587 3199

Emailhurstvillb-h.school@det.nsw.edu.au

Year 7

Term 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

Week 11

BEING A SCIENTIST

Scientists ask questions about how the physical and living world around us works. These might be:

• How are rainbows formed?

• Why are sunsets red?

• Why are dead cockroaches always on their back?

Every one of us is a scientist already, since we are constantly observing and interacting with the world around us. To be a good scientist we must use these observations to think about what is happening.

The work of scientists rarely starts with an experiment but normally with observations made in everyday life or even possibly by accident. Their observations lead them to ask questions like ‘What caused that?' or ‘Why did that happen?'. They then design experiments to answer their questions

LIVING THINGS

There are an estimated 13 to 14 million different types of organisms in the world. So how can we logically organise them? When we are given a large, complicated group of things to organise, the first thing we often do is to sort them into smaller, simpler groups. Say you were given a handful of mixed lollies and told to put them into two groups. How would you do it? What characteristics would you use? Scientists use the same practice of putting things into groups of related types. This is called classification.

Focus outcomes: SC4-1VA, SC4-4WS,SC4-5WS

Focus outcomes: SC4-1VA, SC4-6WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-14LW

 

Term 2

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

LIVING THINGS

There are an estimated 13 to 14 million different types of organisms in the world. So how can we logically organise them? When we are given a large, complicated group of things to organise, the first thing we often do is to sort them into smaller, simpler groups. Say you were given a handful of mixed lollies and told to put them into two groups. How would you do it? What characteristics would you use? Scientists use the same practice of putting things into groups of related types. This is called classification.

 

SEPARATING MIXTURES

You get up in the morning and have a hot shower. Outside there is a mist in the air and frost has made the grass icy. Someone puts the kettle on and steam sprays upwards as it boils. Ice, water and steam are substances that we see and use almost every day. Although they look and act completely differently from each other, they are just different forms of exactly the same thing—water—and contain exactly the same types of particles—water particles. Why then can you dive into a swimming pool but not into a big block of ice? Why is a steam burn more serious than one caused by boiling water? How can we explain this when we cannot see the individual particles of water?

There are a great number of mixtures. Soft drinks, Vegemite, coffee, milk, sea water, hair gel, air and sunscreen are a few examples of mixtures that we see every day. A mixture contains two or more chemically pure substances that may be separated using a physical process such as sieving or filtering. When a mixture is made, no new substances are formed— it's just that the particles of each substance are spread between the particles of the other substances. Look around your home and you will be surprised at the number of different mixtures that we use every day.

Focus outcomes: SC4-1VA, SC4-6WS, SC4-9WS, SC4-14LW

Focus outcomes: SC4-3VA, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-16CW

 

Term 3

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

SEPARATING MIXTURES

 

 

 

 

FORCES AND ENERGY

We experience and use forces every day. Forces allow us to run, stand, write, open drink cans, and play sport. Riding a bike shows how forces can increase our enjoyment or if we take a fall, damage ourselves. If you fall, gravity pulls you
down towards a heavy landing. The force of friction between you and the rough ground scrapes and cuts your elbows and knees. A bike helmet is the only thing that protects your head from the force of impact on the hard ground. So what are these forces that can be great fun or can cause damage? 

Focus outcomes: SC4-3VA, SC4-5WS, SC4-6WS, SC4-8WS, SC4-16CW

Focus outcomes: SC4-2VA, SC4-6WS, SC4-10PW, SC4-11PW

 

Term 4

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

FORCES AND ENERGY

 

EARTH, ROCK AND MINERALS

In 1872 Jules Verne wrote a best-selling novel called A Journey to the Centre of the Earth, in which dinosaurs fought to the death deep inside a hollow Earth. Today geologists are still trying to finding out what actually goes on inside our Earth. Geologists ask us to imagine the Earth as a cracked hard-boiled egg. The thin, cracked shell is the ‘crust' and is divided into plates; within the shell is the ‘mantle' made of firm but slippery egg white, and the solid yolk is the ‘core'. As you move the pieces of shell around, some mantle is exposed. The same thing happens on Earth but this movement causes mountains, earthquakes and volcanoes.

Rocks may not be alive, but they can still tell us quite a lot. Geology is the study of the Earth, including its rocks and minerals. Though we are familiar with the words ‘rock' and ‘mineral', not many of us can give a good definition of what each word really means.

Focus outcomes: SC4-13ES, SC4-1VA, SC4-7WS, SC4-9WS

Focus outcomes: SC4-2VA, SC4-6WS, SC4-10PW, SC4-11PW

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